5th Wheel Towing

174 Items Found
filters section opened Filters
Shop My Store
Shop My Store
3.4 out of 5 Customer Rating 6 Reviews
$99.99
3.3 out of 5 Customer Rating 1 Review
Sale
$1,734.12 $1,907.99
Save $173.87 9% Off
5 out of 5 Customer Rating 22 Reviews
Sale
$379.72 $494.99
Save $115.27 23% Off
5 out of 5 Customer Rating 5 Reviews
Sale
$14 $14.99
6% Off
3.3 out of 5 Customer Rating
Starting at
$1,049.99
3.8 out of 5 Customer Rating 2 Reviews
Sale
$1,130.95 $1,199.99
Save $69.04 5% Off
4.8 out of 5 Customer Rating 3 Reviews
Sale
$2,507.03 $2,934.99
Save $427.96 14% Off
3.6 out of 5 Customer Rating
Sale
$2,130 $2,309.99
Save $179.99 7% Off
4 out of 5 Customer Rating 3 Reviews
Sale
$150.32 $172.69
12% Off
5 out of 5 Customer Rating 1 Review
Sale
$724.32 $791.99
Save $67.67 8% Off
5 out of 5 Customer Rating 22 Reviews
$804.99
3.5 out of 5 Customer Rating 1 Review
Sale
$590.99
5 out of 5 Customer Rating 2 Reviews
Sale
$2,149 $2,309.99
Save $160.99 6% Off

What is a 5th wheel hitch?

A 5th wheel hitch is a type of heavy-duty trailer hitch receiver used for large RVs. It mounts inside the bed of a pickup truck and attaches to the frame. They are very similar to what semi-trucks and trailers use but on a slightly smaller scale.

How does a 5th wheel hitch work?

A 5th wheel hitch uses locking jaws that wrap around the kingpin on a trailer’s pin box to form a connection. This is what physically attaches the trailer to the vehicle. The kingpin pivots inside the jaws when turning. The locking jaw type varies by hitch manufacturer but can be found in the form of a slide bar, single jaw, or dual jaw. The in-bed connection allows the truck to better distribute and handle the weight of the trailer.

What are the different types of 5th wheel hitches?

There are two main types of 5th wheel hitches, fixed and sliding. In general, trucks with a bed shorter than 8’ long will need to use a sliding hitch to provide turning clearance between the truck and trailer. If you have an 8’ bed, a sliding hitch is not needed. The advantage of a fixed hitch is that they are smaller, lighter, and don’t require a manual slide feature to be activated for sharp turns. Conversely, a sliding hitch is going to be larger, heavier, and most require a manual slide feature to be activated for sharp turns.

How do I choose the right 5th wheel hitch for my truck?

In order to find the correct 5th wheel hitch for your truck, look inside your truck bed. Newer 3/4 and 1-ton trucks now come from the factory with a prep package/puck system which allows for easy installation. If you don’t have the prep package/puck system, you can choose from an above-bed mount hitch or an under-bed mount hitch. Next, check your bed length. If you have a short bed, you may need a sliding 5th wheel hitch. Finally, you’ll need to make sure the weight capacity of the hitch exceeds the gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR) of the trailer.

Can I install a 5th wheel hitch myself?

The installation of a 5th wheel hitch varies by type. With a factory prep package/puck system in the truck bed, most individuals can install a hitch themselves without taking it to a shop. If you don’t have any sort of prep package/puck system, installation will be more difficult. At the very least, you’ll need to be comfortable drilling into your truck bed. This requires a good set of tools including a torque wrench. If you have the tools and are mechanically inclined, you can install a 5th wheel hitch yourself. For all others, it’s best to take the truck to a shop for professional installation.

Can I use a 5th wheel hitch on a short bed truck?

Yes, you can use a 5th wheel hitch on a truck with a short bed (usually either 5-1/2’ long or 6-1/2’ long). A sliding hitch is recommended in most cases to provide turning clearance between the truck and trailer during sharp turns.

What size truck do I need to pull a fifth wheel?

The size of the truck required to pull a 5th wheel trailer depends on the weight of the trailer. At the minimum, a full-size truck will be needed. It’s possible for some 1/2-ton trucks to pull a 5th wheel trailer, but 3/4 and 1-ton trucks are much better suited for this. It all comes down to the weight of the trailer and the towing capacity of the truck.

Can a 1500 pull a fifth wheel?

Yes, there are several lightweight 5th wheel trailers that are within the towing capacity range of 1/2-ton pickups. However, it takes the perfect truck and trailer combo for this to be done well. The issue is stability and stopping. A truck towing at max capacity is far more unstable than a truck towing at half capacity. The smaller bed lengths are also a concern due to reduced turning clearance.

Does a fifth wheel hitch increase towing capacity?

In some cases, towing a 5th wheel trailer can offer higher capacities than towing a bumper pull trailer. However, this is not always the case. You need to check the towing capacities in your owner’s manual to confirm this. The reason for higher capacities is that a truck can better support the weight of a trailer when connected over the axle as opposed to under the bumper.

How do I find my truck’s towing capacity?

The first place to look for your truck’s towing capacity is the owner’s manual. Sometimes it can be hard to decipher the manual and get an exact number. Many factors go into towing capacity such as cab size, axle ratio, bed length, engine size, drive type, and so on. Therefore, you need to know a bit about your truck in most cases to find an exact capacity. Furthermore, there are sometimes different figures for different trailer types such as 5th wheel, bumper pull, etc. If not listed in the manual, you may need to call your dealer to have them look this up for you.